Please enter a search term to begin your search.

Home » Archive » Does There Exist An Epistemological Heritage Of Democracies?The Necessary Relationship Between Legal Universalism And Exclusion Practices

Vincenzo Rapone
Does There Exist An Epistemological Heritage Of Democracies?The Necessary Relationship Between Legal Universalism And Exclusion Practices
Comments (0)

1. The universal and the exceptional in the social order according to
Agamben
The aim of this study is to frame the reflections of an important
philosopher, Giorgio Agamben, whose notion of sovereignty affects the
contemporary debate in Italy and abroad. Like Bauman and many other
scholars, Agamben puts the relationship between inclusion and exclusion
at the centre concern of his inquiry, although, unlike Bauman1, however,
he does not regard this relationship with respect to the general features
of the social order. Rather, he takes as his fundamental referent the notion
of man as an uncertain, rather than a given presupposition: thus is always
possible for any of us to wonder, using Levi’s words, “If this is a man”. At
stake in the society of legal universalism, therefore, it is possible
distinguish human and animal life, defining the latter as “bare life”. In
Agamben’s thought, sovereignty is a biopolitical device able to regulate
inclusion in the order of human beings.

1. The universal and the exceptional in the social order according to Agamben
The aim of this study is to frame the reflections of an important philosopher, Giorgio Agamben, whose notion of sovereignty affects the contemporary debate in Italy and abroad. Like Bauman and many other scholars, Agamben puts the relationship between inclusion and exclusion at the centre concern of his inquiry, although, unlike Bauman1, however, he does not regard this relationship with respect to the general features of the social order. Rather, he takes as his fundamental referent the notion of man as an uncertain, rather than a given presupposition: thus is always possible for any of us to wonder, using Levi’s words, “If this is a man”. At stake in the society of legal universalism, therefore, it is possible distinguish human and animal life, defining the latter as “bare life”. In Agamben’s thought, sovereignty is a biopolitical device able to regulate inclusion in the order of human beings.

download this article in PDF format ›

download IJPL volume 2 2011 in PDF format ›